We cooperate as an association to advance the practice of sculpture and the reputation and appreciation of sculpture and sculptors in the community. This is regardless of whether or not we make a living from sculpture and regardless of our preferred style or medium. To this end we support artists’ moral rights, we advocate a professional attitude to the production and presentation of work and encourage the artistic and intellectual stimulation of interaction amongst artists of all persuasions.

Vale Graeme Cameron

 
"Blade" by Graeme Cameron
After a distinguished career in architecture, Graeme took up sculpting as an expression of his creativity in retirement, perfectly in tune with the rich and diverse cultural life he and Carol had led over the years. 

By happy coincidence I was running limestone sculpture workshops at Bulleen Art & Garden in the early 2000s, and Graeme turned up for a session. After that we had many sculpting adventures together in his garden studio. It turned out that Graeme had already acquired a couple of my pieces for his garden, having sold some of his renowned art collection in order to "re-invest". 

Graeme’s professional experience conditioned him towards clearcut linear style; he said it took him months to re-learn to draw a circle. I remember when he created a beautiful nymph perched on a stump, and he was so proud of breaking out from his architectural training. He developed his own personal style with an immaculate sense of design, a love of clear simple form, giving his pieces a strikingly timeless quality. Graeme’s personal style enriched our ASV exhibitions for the brief time he was able to make and show sculpture.

In retirement Graeme continued to pack a lot into his life, despite the assault of debilitating ill health. With generous spirit he shared his experience and enthusiasm by tutoring sculpting to residents of a local aged care facility – one of his students just happened to be Sir William Dargie.

With equal joy and dedication Graeme shared his music, as an accomplished Cello player. He never gave up his beloved Cello, continuing to play from the confines of a wheelchair.

Our abiding memories include such lively creative times enjoying the warmth of Graeme and Carol’s hospitable company – great discussions: art, philosophy, politics, meaning of life . . . accompanied by fine music and fine food.

From our time together, both teacher and student learned equally from one another.



Kevin Free
 

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